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Archives & Manuscripts

George M. Justice Memorandums, 1825-1861

 Collection
Identifier: SFHL-RG5-298
George M. Justice was a Philadelphia merchant and important Hicksite Quaker. Beginning in 1825, he kept four volumes of memorandum reflecting his thoughts on religion, the Hicksite Separation and its aftermath in Philadelphia, family information, astronomy, slavery, and other topics such as slavery and finance. Volume 4 includes letters, clippings and other materials, some pasted in and some inserted between the pages which mainly deal with the death of his son Rudulph. Justice was a member of the Representative Committee and the Indian Committee of Philadelphia Yearly Meeting. He was an elder at Green Street Monthly Meeting although he expressed doubts about the usefulness of elders and some aspects of the Discipline such as disowning members for marrying out.

Dates

  • 1825-1861

Creator

Extent

.5 Linear Feet : 4 bound volumes

Overview

George M. Justice was a successful Philadelphia merchant and important Hicksite Quaker. Beginning in 1825 until shortly before his death, he kept volumes of memorandum reflecting his thoughts on religion, the Hicksite Separation and its aftermath in Philadelphia, family information, astronomy, slavery, and other topics.

Biographical / Historical

George Middleton Justice (1792-1862), a prominent Quaker and successful Philadelphia merchant, was the son of George and Phebe Justice, members of Philadelphia Monthly Meeting of the Northern District. In 1816 he married Esther Syng Bunting (1795-1883), daughter of Philip and Elizabeth Bunting also members of PMM- ND. George and Esther's children were Alfred Bunting, Philip S., Elizabeth, Rudulph, George, and Caroline Justice. George M. Justice strongly allied with the Hicksite branch. He served as an Elder at Green Street Monthly Meeting as well as on the Representative and Indian Committees of Philadelphia Yearly Meeting. Although committed to the Society, he expressed doubts about some of its policies including the role of Elders and the practices of disowning members for marrying non-members and for working outside the Society of Friends towards the abolition of slavery. He was strongly against slavery and feared that bloodshed would be its result. Justice also served on the Board of the Public Schools in Philadelphia from 1836 to 1841 and was a members of its first Committee on High School. An enthusiastic amateur astronomer, he contributed his observations to the newspapers and donated his telescope to establish a public observatory.

Immediate Source of Acquisition

Gift of Carol Grugan, Acc. 2016.024

Related Materials

George M. Justice Papers, SC 066. See also Miscellaneous Manuscripts, MSS/004.
Title
Inventory of the George M. Justice Memorandums, 1825-1861
Status
completed
Author
Susanna Morikawa
Date
February 2017
Description rules
dacs

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