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The New York Colored Mission records

 Collection
Identifier: HC.MC-1123

Scope and Contents

The records of a Quaker organization from the mid-19th to mid-20th centuries, with social and training offerings in New York, particularly to the African American community, and based on the principle of obtaining jobs and decent housing for African Americans.

Dates

  • 1865-1964

Access Restrictions

The collection is open for research use.

Use Restrictions

Standard Federal Copyright Laws Apply (U.S. Title 17).

Biographical / Historical

According to an article of its constitution, the objectives of the New York Colored Mission were the “religious, moral, and social elevation of the colored people.” Programs to this end were classes in cooking, sewing, carpentry, and bible instruction. The Mission also had a lodging house, employment agency, and district nurse. Its Fresh Air program gave black women and children a chance to spend some time in the country.

The New York Colored Mission was under the care of the Society of Friends from its inception in 1865. It was incorporated by the state of New York in 1871. Its objectives were “to conduct in the city of New York Sabbath schools for religious instruction, social religious meetings, an evening school for adults, a sewing school, a mother's meeting, an employment office, a free reading room, and a temperance society, also to employ missionaries to aid the society in promoting the foregoing." It also provided residence for some women. It was located on both 130th and 131st Streets in New York City until 1941, when it was reduced to three houses on 131st St. It was affiliated with the Protestant Welfare Federation.

Originally named the African Sunday School Association, the Mission was later renamed the New York Colored Mission. The governing arm of the Mission consisted of a Board of Managers and a Board of Trustees. While the managers, appointed by the trustees, carried on the work of the Mission, their actions were subject to approval by the Trustees.

Two of the Mission's leaders were Joshua L. Barton, 1849-1926, and Levi Hollingsworth Wood, 1873-1956. Barton, a doctor, was elected to the Board of Managers in 1883; he served as secretary and president of the Board of Trustees until his death in 1926. Wood, a lawyer, was elected secretary of the Board of Trustees in 1898, a position he held till his death in 1956. He was also active in other social work, and was chairman of the Board of the National Urban League.

Based on the Washingtonian principle of obtaining jobs and decent housing for blacks, the New York Colored Mission officially terminated in 1966 when the duBoisian principle of immediate equality for black people became preeminent. Assets of the Mission were turned over to New York Monthly Meeting.

Extent

6 Linear Feet (9 documents and 7 volumes)

Language

English

Overview

The records of a Quaker organization from the mid-19th to the mid-20th centuries, with social and training offerings in New York, particularly to the African American community, and based on the principle of obtaining jobs and decent housing for African Americans.

Separated Materials

Separated material: Printed pamphlets and booklets published by The New York Colored Mission to PG & QC

Processing Information

Original processing information unknown.
Title
The New York Colored Mission records, 1865-1964
Description rules
Describing Archives: A Content Standard
Language of description
English
Script of description
Latin

Find It at the Library

Most of the materials in this catalog are not digitized and can only be accessed in person. Please see our website for more information about visiting Haverford College Quaker & Special Collections Library

Contact:
370 Lancaster Ave
Haverford PA 19041 USA US