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Archives & Manuscripts

Antislavery movements

 Subject
Subject Source: Library of Congress Subject Headings

Found in 11 Collections and/or Records:

Baltimore Society for the Protection of Free People of Color minutes

 Collection
Identifier: SFHL-SC-211
Abstract Minute book of the Baltimore Society for the Protection of Free People of Color, 1827-29. Includes Constitution, Articles (by-laws), and signatures of sixteen members.

Joseph A. and Ruth Dugdale Correspondence

 Collection
Identifier: SFHL-SC-032
Abstract Correspondence of Dugdale and his wife, Ruth Dugdale, both of whom were active in reform efforts such as the abolition of slavery and women's rights. Correspondents include Susan B. Anthony, Frederick Douglass, Thomas Garrett, William Lloyd Garrison, James Mott, Lucretia Mott, and Wendell Phillips.

Fussell-Lewis Family Papers

 Collection
Identifier: SFHL-SC-045
Abstract This collection includes the papers and correspondence of the Fussell and Lewis famlies. The latter relate primarily family and local news. Of particular interest are several letters by Graceanna Lewis denouncing slavery, an account of the response in New York Yearly Meeting to the disownment of Isaac T. Hopper, and correspondence relating an encounter with the Seneca Indians. Other letters include those written to Mariann Lewis by friends from Kimberton Boarding School, some of which relate to...

Hanbury-Aggs Family Papers

 Collection
Identifier: SFHL-RG5-058
Overview The Hanbury and Aggs families were prominent English Quakers who were involved in a variety of mercantile and philanthropic activities, predominantly in the 19th century. They were pharmacologists, silk merchant in Shanghai, travelers, and philanthropists (Thomas Hanbury was knighted in 1901 for his philanthropy). The collection contains correspondence, journals, business and financial papers, and other miscellaneous material. Includes Daniel Bell Hanbury's journals of his travels with William...

Emily Howland Family Papers

 Collection
Identifier: SFHL-RG5-066
Overview Emily Howland (1827-1929) was a Quaker humanitarian and educator who is particularly known for her work with freed slaves in Virginia during and after the American Civil War. A birthright Friend, Emily Howland was the only daughter of Slocum and Hannah (Tallcot) Howland of Sherwood, N.Y. She was educated locally and for a brief period in Philadelphia, and then moved to Washington, D.C. in 1857 to teach at the Miner School for Freedmen. During the war she worked at a contraband camp in Virginia,...

Samuel M. Janney Papers

 Collection
Identifier: SFHL-RG5-183
Overview Samuel McPherson Janney was a Virginia Quaker minister, author, educator, and reformer. In 1839 he opened a boarding school for girls in Loudoun County. He traveled widely in the ministry, meeting with other denominations as well as being immersed in the contemporary issues facing the Society of Friends. Among his activities were establishing schools for African Americans and women, creating public schools in Virginia, and the abolition of slavery. In 1869 he was appointed Superintendent of...

Lewis-Fussell Family Papers

 Collection
Identifier: SFHL-RG5-087
Overview Bartholomew Fussell was a Quaker minister who married Rebecca Bond at Abington Monthly Meeting in Pennsylvania in 1781. He was a member of Uwchlan Monthly Meeting of Friends at his death in 1838. The couple had eight children, viz. Esther, William, Sarah, Joseph, Jacob, Bartholomew, Rebecca, and Solomon. Esther married John Lewis in 1818, and they had four children, among whom was Graceanna Lewis, Quaker scientist and humanitarian. Joseph Fussell married Elizabeth Moore in 1814, and their...

Longshore-Williams family correspondence

 Collection
Identifier: SFHL-SC-076
Abstract This collection includes letters written to Mary W. Longshore from the family of her sister, Martha Williams, after the Williams moved from Pennsylvania to Warsaw, Ohio. Included are letters from her sister, brother-in-law, Isaac B. Williams, and nephews, Jonathon and Jeremiah. These letters relate family and local news, and news about the temperance and anti-slavery movements. A letter from Isaac B. Williams, dated 1861, relates his thoughts on the prospect of civil war. A letter from Dr....

Pennsylvania Hall Association Records

 Collection
Identifier: SFHL-RG4-074
Overview The Pennsylvania Hall Association was a stockholders association formed in 1837 to erect a building in Philadelphia dedicated “to Liberty and the Rights of Man.” Many of the primary movers behind the Association were Quakers involved in the anti-slavery movement. The building was opened on May 14, 1838, and, as a symbol of the abolitionist movement, was destroyed by an angry mob on May 17, 1838. This collection contains minutes of the Board of Managers of the Association, 1838-1847, financial...

Protests Against Slavery

 Collection
Identifier: HC.MC-975-11-055
Overview This collection includes the 1688 Germantown Protest and the 1696 Merion Protest. The Germantown Protest was the first organized petition against slavery in the Americas. The Merion protest led to the first instance in which Phildadelphia Yearly Meeting addressed the slave trade.