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Archives & Manuscripts

Women and peace -- History -- Sources

 Subject
Subject Source: Library Of Congress Subject Headings

Found in 4 Collections and/or Records:

Jane Addams Collection

 Collection
Identifier: SCPC-DG-001
Overview A world-famous social reformer; co-founded the first settlement house in America in 1889; championed many causes on behalf of the urban poor, such as protection of immigrants, child labor laws, industrial safety, juvenile courts, and recognition of labor unions; a leading figure in the movement for international peace; awarded the Nobel Peace Prize in 1931.
Dates: 1838-; Majority of material found within 1880-1935

Emily Greene Balch Papers

 Collection
Identifier: SCPC-DG-006
Abstract Emily Greene Balch (1867-1961) was the second U.S. woman to have won the Nobel Peace Prize. Balch embarked on her academic career in the economics and sociology department at Wellesley College. Balch's extracurricular work with the Women's Trade Union League and opposition to World War I resulted in dismissal from Wellesley, and thereafter she helped lead the Women's International League for Peace and Freedom. Called a "Citizen of the World," Balch worked for peace throughout her life--through...
Dates: 1842-1961; Majority of material found within 1875 - 1961

Hannah Clothier Hull Papers

 Collection
Identifier: SCPC-DG-016
Abstract Hannah Clothier Hull (1872-1958), was one of the founders of the Woman's Peace Party and the Women's International League for Peace and Freedom. She served as a national officer of the WILPF for nearly forty years. Hull was also active in other social reform movements. A member of a well-to-do Quaker family, Hannah Clothier graduated from Swarthmore College in 1891. She first worked at a Philadelphia settlement house and then entered the graduate program in social work at Bryn Mawr College. In...
Dates: 1889-1958